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MATT WILSON QUARTET / CATHERINE DELAUNAY

"Vol pour Sidney" (retour)
Matt Wilson, drums / Jeff Lederer, tenor saxophone, clarinet / Kirk Knuffke, trompet, cornet / Chris Lightcap, double bass

Guest : Catherine Delaunay, clarinet

In 1992, Nato records and producer Jean Rochard paid a personal tribute to Sidney Bechet’s music in a mood worthy of the Creole musician from New Orleans, i.e. a music full of technical prowess, lyrical commitment, playful and swinging surprises, and popular melodies. Lol Coxhill, Steve Beresford, Han Bennink, Charlie Watts, Evan Parker, Pat Thomas, Lee Konitz and many others were called in to perform the legendary "Petite Fleur", "La Nuit est une sorcière" (ballet music), "Si tu vois ma mère", "Laughing in Rhythm"… and the hilarious "Lastic". The album was entitled "Vol Pour Sidney (aller)" (One way ticket to Sidney).

And now, here is the return trip with Matt Wilson and Catherine Delaunay on the journey. Selected drummer of the year by DownBeat in 2009 and nominated for the Grammy Awards, Matt Wilson does not content himself with the easy situation of a highly skilled musician, resting upon his fine musicality and knowledge of the Jazz history. This New York drummer who was born in Illinois erases his tracks and makes fun of any conventionalism. He joyfully plays an ageless music. Dewey Redman was his real spiritual father. Among the bands that rock and shake, from Hard Bop to free improvisation, the Matt Wilson Quintet likes to stand at the crossroads between live research and some idea of popular music.

 
CHAPTER THREE : SIDNEY BECHET

ARCHIE SHEPP PLAYS SIDNEY BECHET100 years of Jazz

Archie Shepp, saxophones, vocals / Olivier Miconi, trumpet / Sébastien Llado, trombone / Wayne Dockery, double bass / Tom McClung, piano / Steve Mc Craven, drums

My Man. That’s the heading used by Archie Shepp for his first tribute to Sidney Bechet; thus forging a direct, friendly, brotherly bond with him. So many things connect these two playboys of the Western World, indeed. Before he settled in France, Sidney Bechet, a man of the people from New Orleans, went through Europe, up to Russia, or USSR, up to the Balkans, up to Turkey, Egypt. From one’s spinning vibrato to the other’s raging hoarseness, from a supreme elation to an unpredictable melancholia… Bechet, Shepp, two complementary ways to stir (to fire) the lyrical inspiration in its widest range; two strong characters; two “traditional” men, because this tradition is the one of experiment and life’s full force: Our men in Jazz.